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Thread: Over the bug deflector

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cambridge, Ontario
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    4,405

    Default Over the bug deflector

    I'm going to keep this one going.

    Reflections of my views of circumstances of the week.
    You can't fix stupid

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Ottawa,ON.
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    Default

    Great idea Buzzy.

    Holly
    no sir I wasn't speeding, I was qualifying

    www.sosoconvoy.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Cambridge, Ontario
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    Default Week of November 19 2006

    Started out today for Chicago. I remembered later why I quit going there.

    After a 3 hour ride into the "WINDY" to drop off a small machine I headed for Crawfordsville Indiana. Two hours later I finally got to I-80/94 and proceeded south.

    Made the drop, got layed-over to reload in Bloomington. Now is it just me or do the rest of you notice your shippers trying for more than they pay for?

    Pick up info given I called customer received instructions how to get to their plant. On arrival I was informed "oh the product is at our other facility 8 miles away but you'll have to come back here for your paperwork after you're loaded."

    It got better after that.

    Wednesday I delivered in Owen Sound at 8am and received a dispatch for a load of machinery in Cambridge.

    Arrived at 11:30 was told the "guys" would be right out.

    At 1:30 a "suit" comes out to the yard to show me whats going on my trailer. I question the width of two of the items as I was dragging a rolltite trailer and he matter of factly said no problem.

    I don't trust anyone so I measured them myself. one piece was 100 inches wide, the 2nd questionable pc appeared to be exactly 102 wide.

    An hour later ONE LOADER shows up. Then the "suit" comes around the corner and matter of factly says when I'm loaded I have another pick up.

    I called dispatch. They knew nothing of the 2nd pick, were getting paid for 1 and told me not to go after it. I told customer. He wasn't happy.

    At 4pm we( I was helping this loader, otherwise I'd still be there) get to this questionable piece of equipment. I can't get my curtain closed passed it so it (the machine)required some remodeling with a very big sledge hammer. Oh yeah, I slipped and went off my deck. 5ft to terra firma.

    I finally got out of there at 5pm.

    Then, on top of this fiasco, I'm still fuming over the rest of the week, My knee hurts from the fall, and I've been formulating a nasty letter regarding an article I had read in a December issue of a Canadian Truck Magazine. I get to the yard, get parked. And go home.

    Today was supposed to be a day off. WRONG!!

    Queen B decided it would be a good day to paint the master bedroom.

    Friday I get to do driver reviews. I'd rather go
    You can't fix stupid

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    207

    Default

    curtain closed passed it so it (the machine)required some remodeling with a very big sledge hammer. Oh yeah, I slipped and went off my deck. 5ft to terra firma.
    In winter it is very slippery, how often do you fall in the winter time buzzy

    Just kidden my friend

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Ottawa,ON.
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    Default

    He falls a lot any time of the yr.

    You know what the suits are like Buzzy. Good thing you don't have the trust in them. So many times we have been screwed over by suits. All they see are pic's. They have no idea on size, weight or anything that has to deal with getting their frieght otr.

    Holly
    no sir I wasn't speeding, I was qualifying

    www.sosoconvoy.com

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Cambridge, Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by admin
    curtain closed passed it so it (the machine)required some remodeling with a very big sledge hammer. Oh yeah, I slipped and went off my deck. 5ft to terra firma.
    In winter it is very slippery, how often do you fall in the winter time buzzy

    Just kidden my friend

    I actually slipped trying to run chains over around and through the friggin machine while balancing on an outside rub rail.

    Falls/slips, cuts and bruises are common in flat bedding. Injuries,sprains and strains are more frequent the older ya get.

    At least I don't get people sending me shoe replacements, H.C.
    You can't fix stupid

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Canada
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    7,773

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by buzzy
    Quote Originally Posted by admin
    curtain closed passed it so it (the machine)required some remodeling with a very big sledge hammer. Oh yeah, I slipped and went off my deck. 5ft to terra firma.
    In winter it is very slippery, how often do you fall in the winter time buzzy

    Just kidden my friend

    I actually slipped trying to run chains over around and through the friggin machine while balancing on an outside rub rail.

    Falls/slips, cuts and bruises are common in flat bedding. Injuries,sprains and strains are more frequent the older ya get.

    At least I don't get people sending me shoe replacements, H.C.

    Broken backs too:

    The day his life changed forever
    Lucien Bleau had loaded trailers with pipe a thousand times before. At 60, he was a pro. After all, he'd been driving trucks and working in the pipeline and oil field industry since he was 16 years old. Lucien Bleau had no reason to believe that on this clear, chilly morning in March something would go terribly wrong.

    He was up on the trailer, standing on top of six tiers of drill pipe. Two square pipe racks were loaded on top of that and there was flare line on top of the racks. He was reaching for a steel cable when he heard someone yell his name. "I could see the flare line rolling towards me," he says. "I jumped."

    He managed to jump far enough to avoid being crushed by the rolling pipe, but he landed on the frozen ground hitting his head and smashing his spine. As he lay on the ground in the bush in Lodgepole, Alberta waiting for an ambulance, Lucien was in shock and continued asking the guys to keep unloading his truck.

    It was only hours later, laying in the neurotrauma unit at the University of Alberta Hospital that Lucien learned the extent of his physical injuries. His brain was bleeding in three places. One vertebra had been crushed. Another one was bruised. His left shoulder was bright purple and swollen.

    The doctors say Lucien will never be able to drive a rig again. The pain is always there – some days are worse than others, but his attitude is inspiring. "I went through depression. I wondered why it happened to me. I just tell myself 'hey, I'm walking, I'm talking – things are good.'"


    "How have I been treated by the WCB?
    Fantastic."


    As a self-employed trucker, Lucien had been paying insurance premiums to the Workers' Compensation Board for years. "I have always paid WCB and I've encouraged other owner/operators to exercise the option of personal coverage," he says. "How have I been treated by the WCB? Fantastic."

    He says he doesn't have the added stress of worrying about finances now. The WCB covers all of his medical treatments and he has a case manager that "gives a damn."
    "If there is such a thing as a guardian angel, my case manager is…a very compassionate, caring person. There are no short cuts for her."

    Lucien's wife, Lynda, agrees. "Our life was in a shambles," she says. "My husband was in agony, he couldn't hear anything and he couldn't remember anything. Deb was just so good to us. One day I called her to thank her for all of her help and she said something I will never forget. 'It is my job, but it's your life.'"

    "It was our life," Lynda says, "and if I had had to fight for things on top of everything that was going on, it would have been horrible. She (Deb) has got such a good attitude."

    In light of everything that has happened, Lucien can't stress enough the importance of insurance coverage for people working in all aspects of the trucking industry. "To me the WCB is like any large company – there's good and there's bad. My belief is that there's more good than bad."

    It's been nearly a year since Lucien Bleau's life changed forever. He suffers from
    short-term memory loss due to his brain injury and he can't walk or sit for long periods of time. Even so, Lucien maintains a positive outlook. "I actually feel very fortunate," he beams. "It's that old saying that you've got to have something happen sometimes to realize how lucky you are."
    I thought I had made a mistake until I realised that it was just an error.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    winnipeg mb
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    373

    Default

    I agree about chicago the ipass helps alot as no stoping on most routes you cruise at 55 it reads it and charges it. I had a delivery in elkhart in it was a friday.I got to place they had 6 forklifts went to were i was told to wait took off chains and tarps.the first two hours are free that time goes by no forklift.I got there atnoon. I went to the office told them i was waiting and the two hrs was up i told had to reload in peru il.means going down 80 right through chicago.they never came i informed dispatch nothing.At 4pm i lost it i had been up since 4am I went and told office that i needed 200 dollars as i could no longer make reload and with no idle on lot i had to get room to sleep. I was unloaded at 6pm. I went to the ta hooked up to idle air went to bed.now the funny part acording to fleet manager it was my fault and they would not pay me for the weekend i had to wait.A whole 50 dollars. told to keep if need that bad.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Cambridge, Ontario
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    Default week 2

    Started out Sunday reeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeely early. I loaded at 5am in Brantford for Kentucky. This leg of trip was a blast.
    Unloaded and headed to Nashville Monday.

    Load was supposed to be 5 dies (14000 lbs)

    Turns out it's the equipment to move the dies, covered in electronics and robotics. price..can't say or I'd have to shoot. Plus it's a full load!

    Anyway, my "dream team" loaders decided that since I had a flatbed and the because $$$ value of load the equipment had to be cocooned in plastic.

    Only problem was, NOW its wrapped I can't see where to tie (chain)them down at. So I proceeded to cut holes out of the plastic to gain acess to the tie down points. After I was done chaining, rocket scientist #1 starts re-shrinkwrapping around my chains. I queried him on the possibility that maybe I might have to retighten them after 4-500 miles. ( I haven't yet, 650 miles later, but...... I'm not done the delivery yet.)

    Then, I had to tarp. Joy of Joy I had help. Bobby (44 years old) and Billy (56). Ya gotta love the south.

    Twice I faxed paperwork to the broker. Twice they say they never got it but the fax confirmations said they did. Ms. "Congeniality ", after the 2nd failure asked me if I'd like to try again! "No lady, I said I'm just gonna drive right on by customs, what do you think?" I then told her I was refaxing, and they'd better get it right this time cuz there was a crane scheduled to unload me @ $500/hour and if I was late they were paying waiting time on it.

    Son of a gun, I faxed the papers, waited an hour and called to confirm they'd received them and I was told yes they'd got them and customs had already cleared the load. GO FIGURE!!

    Well anyway, I deliver in the morning, but the broker didn't need to know that part.

    And the week is only half over.
    You can't fix stupid

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